Predictive Measures for Organ Transplant Rejections

BY YUSHA SUN While organ transplant operations have been increasingly successful over the past few years, the ultimate concern is whether the transplants will be successful in the long term. Unfortunately often, organ transplants get rejected, as the body’s immune system may suddenly attack the donor organ and cause it to fail. In heart transplants,…

Development of Novel Flow Cytometry Technique to Study Yellow Fever Virus

BY DEVORAH SAFFERN Researchers in the Ploss lab of the Molecular Biology department at Princeton University have utilized a new technology to analyze the pathogenesis of the yellow fever virus (YFV), which can be applied to other viruses and lead to significant progress in understanding disease mechanisms. Published in Nature Communications on March 14, their…

Combating Blood Shortage: In vitro Red Blood Cells

BY SHARON WASHIO At any given time, or more exactly every 2 seconds, blood transfusions are needed for complicated surgeries, treatments, accident victims, sickle patients, pregnancy complications, severely anemic children, and more. While blood can be donated even concurrently with the use of medications like aspirin, and in the U.S. approximately 38% of the population…

American Heart Month

Nicholas Persaud February is the month dedicated to the heart in more ways than one. Most people know about Valentine’s day but they probably don’t know that the month of February is American Heart Month. Heart health is an extremely important issue worldwide. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, heart disease is…

The Links between Gut Microbes and Human Disease

BY DEVORAH SAFFERN Our guts are composed of thousands of bacterial species, many of which are essential for physiological processes like digestion and fighting disease. Recent findings suggest that these microbes – the types of which are specific to each individual – are linked to several diseases that affect much of our population. Studying the…

Blood-based prion detection: a breakthrough?

BY YUSHA SUN Prion diseases are a group of infectious, mostly fatal neurological diseases that affect all animals, including humans. Prion diseases are caused by prions, infectious agents made from a conformationally altered form of the natural PrP protein. They are especially dangerous due to their ability to propagate in the body and brain indefinitely…

MicroRNAs: The Future of Cancer Treatments

BY SHARON WASHIO Existing treatments for cancer have varying levels of success depending on the type, location, stage of cancer, and more. Such options include chemotherapy, radiation, drugs, or surgery, but those afflicted must often keep an eye out for relapse even when the cancer seems to momentarily go away. Though improved pharmaceuticals and enhanced…

The War on Disease: The Creation of a Global Vaccine-Development Fund

By Moses Im Just recently, the Ebola outbreak lead to over 11,000 deaths. Yet, the pandemic also exposed the constant looming threats that affect global health due to the lack of necessary medicines and vaccines. Thus, as the world shook in fear, WHO (World Health Organization) and other supporting countries rushed in to control and stop…

World AIDS Day: Fact vs. Fiction

In light of the recent World AIDS Day on December 1st, writer Nicholas Persaud takes a closer look at the disease and dispels facts from fiction.

11 Tips for Living a Happier and Healthier Life

Natalia Brokate Take Time for Yourself Eat a meal alone. Read a book. Fly a kite. Seriously, anything works. Just do it. I guarantee that you will feel refreshed after spending time alone with your thoughts. According to Dr. Reed Larson from the University of Illinois, alone time plays a constructive role in daily life…